Ida Hove Solberg. Foto: Pia Nordin
Ida Hove Solberg. Foto: Pia Nordin

Abstract

Recent research has drawn attention to the field of literary translation during wartime or under military occupation in countries such as Belgium (Gouanvic 2001), Germany (Rundle & Sturge 2010) and France (Lombez 2013; 2016; 2017). This seminary turns the spot light on occupied Norway. How did literary translation happen in 1940 – 1945, when Norway was occupied by Nazi ruled Germany? What characterized the policies, processes and regulations of translation of literature in this period? How did publishers navigate within the ideological constraints of the literary field of that time in order to publish translated literature?

Focusing on a regulation of translated literature that was implemented by Nazi authorities during the occupation, this paper firstly describes the process of how this regulation came about, and secondly how some publishers attempted to circumvent the new regulation. The main source of data is the archival material from the Nazi-instated Ministry of Culture and Public Education in Oslo, notably that of the sub-department for literary affairs, the Literature and Library Office. Adopting a data-driven model in the investigation of the archival material, the aim is to shed new light both on the particularities of the regulation’s origin and on the ideological implications of the regulation implemented during the occupation of Norway, and thus to add Norwegian data to previous studies on the politics of translation stemming from Nazi ideology.